Washiabaca Canvas
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Washiabaca Canvas

Washiabaca Canvas

Description

A very new fabric with ancient roots. A heavyweight canvas made from washi processed Abacá yarns. Abacá is a traditional Philippine fiber also known as manilla hemp. Historically it was used to make rope and turned into heavy-duty paper which manilla folders and envelopes are made. Washi yarns are a traditional Japanese process where wash paper was cut and twisted into yarns that could then be woven into fabric. Halfway in-between Japan and the Philippines is Taiwan, where the process of turning abacá into washi yarns was perfected on an industrial scale, enabling the creation of something quite different and modern. The driving force between the fabrics creation was the Swiss bad brand Qwstion who were looking to produce the most sustainable bag fabric possible. Abacá can be grown freely without chemicals and produces a strong, durable and lightweight yarn with a cool touch that cleanly biodegrades at the end of its lifecycle. Durable enough to make into bags, but comfortable enough to wear. Washiabaca is quite distinct from any textile we’ve used before. It’s Closest analogue is the Duckcloth which uses almost the same weave structure. But cotton staple yarns and abacá washi yarns are two very different materials. The Washiabaca is a touch lighter, but has a much cooler touch. Because the yarns are literally made of paper it also folds and creases in interesting ways quite different than you might expect from a fabric. It takes on lots of character as it ages but also can hold folds harder than most fabrics creating very interesting creases and fantastic drape.